I hate always giving this news, but more snow is expected to fall on the Quad Cities tomorrow (Friday) into Saturday morning. Most areas throughout the Quad Cities will see 1+" of snow, but some areas do have a potential to see snowfall totals greater than 3".

According to the National Weather Service (NWS) of the Quad Cities, snow is likely to fall Friday afternoon into Saturday morning. There is a high potential for 1" or more across a large portion of the Quad Cities are. There is also a moderate potential for 2 or more inches.

National Weather Service of the Quad Cities

Officials say that confidence is low on higher amounts, but there could be a narrow band of over 3" of snow. The NWS says it is too early to know where this band would set up.

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Right now, officials from the NWS say that the snow will be dry and powdery which may result in blowing and drifting in open areas. Winds will be coming out of north/northwest and could be gusting around 20 mph.

The snow isn't all we are going to get. Officials from the NWS say that in addition to the snow, we will see extreme cold wind chills ranging between -10° to -25°. We will have a story for you about extreme wind chill temperatures expected this weekend soon.

This is the current forecast according to the National Weather Service of the Quad Cities:

  • Friday
    • A 30 percent chance of snow after 1pm.
    • Mostly cloudy and cold, with a high near 6.
    • Wind chill values as low as -20.
      • North wind 10 to 15 mph.
  • Friday Night
    • Snow likely, mainly after 7pm.
    • Mostly cloudy, with a low around -1.
    • Wind chill values as low as -15.
      • North wind around 10 mph.
    • Chance of precipitation is 70%.
      • New snow accumulation of 1 to 3 inches possible.
  • Saturday
    • Snow likely, mainly before 7am.
    • Partly sunny and cold, with a high near 6.
    • Chance of precipitation is 60%.
      • New snow accumulation of less than one inch possible.

Safety Tips For Surviving the Quad Cities Cold Temps